Category: InDesign

Having Trouble With Submissions?

File submissions made easy with this simplified checklist of the most commonly made mistakes:

STEP ONE: CHECK YOUR DOCUMENT

*Before any exporting is done check for these things*

-Do all images on the edge of the page go to the red bleed line?

-If you have a background color, does it fully extend to the red bleed line?

-Is everything spelt correctly? Have someone different proofread the copy. Often the author of the copy will overlook simple mistakes because they know how it is supposed to read.

-Do any of your images look funny? They may not be proportionately fitting to your frame. If this is the case… <Right Click> and choose the fitting option <fill frame proportionately>

-Do you have any errors? Check the bottom of the InDesign workspace. You will either see a green dot that says “No Errors” or a red dot indicating how many errors you have. Double click that area if you have errors and it will explain what the problem is. Errors may be in linking or overset text.

-Do you see any random boxes on your spread? You may have accidentally created an empty frame. Using your selection tool select the empty frame and just click the backspace or delete button on your keyboard.

STEP TWO: SET UP YOUR PDF EXPORT

*No mistakes? You are ready to set up your PDF export*

-Go to File >Export >Choose file format Adobe PDF (Print)

-Save in the following format: XXXX_002-003_MonthDay

BREAK DOWN:

-XXXX is your job number. If you are unsure of this number it will be listed in the slug of your templates

-002-003 is the range of pages you are exporting. This could be 002-003 or 122-193. Make sure this area matches the page numbers you are exporting. If you are exporting your cover this will say cover, not a page range. If you are exporting your endsheets, this will say endsheet-back or endsheet-front, not a page range.

-MonthDay is the date you exported your documents or the day you are submitting for proofs. For example: If you are submitting XXXX_002-003, XXXX_004-005 and XXXX_006-007 but you exported them on different days, the days should all be the exact same day, today’s date (the day you are submitting) So they might all read 1234_002-003_Dec18, 1234_004-005_Dec18, 1234_006-007_Dec 18

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STEP THREE: TIME TO PACKAGE YOUR FILES

Packaging is a very important step. It will ensure that all images and fonts used in your design will be included with your saved documents. You will only need to package your document if you are submitting a cover, dust jacket, GradBox or MovieBook. Otherwise you will be ready to submit after STEP TWO.

To Package your InDesign file go to:

File >Package

From here you will save your packaged file in the same naming format listed in STEP TWO. Once everything is packaged into your folder you can right click the folder and compress it to a .ZIP file and you are ready to submit!

Summer Campers warmed up for the new season

FutureBook hosts camps and workshops during summer and fall months to kickstart creativity and yearbook training. The largest workshop, taking place over three days at St. Michaels University School, in Victoria, BC, recently wrapped up. It was the warmest camp on record, with temperatures reaching up to 32 degrees! Plenty of cold water, a raucous game of Chuck the Chicken and a refreshing auditorium helped to keep the students cool.

Photo courtesy of Sid Akselrod

Photo courtesy of Sid Akselrod

“Throughout the camp, the students were challenged to bring together the ideas and techniques the they learned and create their own layout. It was also an opportunity for students to meet new people and get inspired from what other schools have done. It goes without saying that the three days were not only filled with work but also excitement!” Joanna Zhang, Vancouver Technical

Adobe InDesign training was the focus of this workshop, but education was rounded out with copywriting, file management, deadline scheduling, infographic creation, photoshop manipulation and much more. Some students and advisors return to the summer camp yearly to freshen their skills, while others are just joining a yearbook staff for the first time. As always, the evolution in skills and design the campers show in only a few days is incredible. This is certainly thanks to passionate and amazing yearbook advisors: Rainer Mehl from Kitsilano Secondary, Noah Choy from Delview Secondary and Nigel Reedman from Vancouver Technical all helped to provide training and expertise during the camp.

We love seeing the camaraderie as yearbook staffs unite from all different schools and cities. Whether they’re swapping stories over a glass of chocolate milk in the Hogwarts-esque dinning hall, getting a taste of college life rooming in dorms, busting a gut watching their peers get called into a improv show, the camp really allows for a journey of discovery for future editors.

“I went to the yearbook camp in 2015 and 2016, and it has been a blast! From the lectures, classes, taking photos and even messing around in the dorm room; the whole experience was amazing and it’s going to be disappointing when I’m graduated and don’t get to come back!” Brooke Vibert, Brookswood Secondary

View student layouts here: https://youtu.be/N_dOMf9pk90

View student photos here: https://youtu.be/MQOHtS-tY7w

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Photo courtesy of Sid Akselrod

Photo courtesy of Sid Akselrod

 

 

 

2 super ways working in yearbook can make you money today

Yearbook can feel like a thankless job. Once the yearbook is distributed, there are always people who want to point out typos, or complain about colour choices and other minor objections. No one knows that you spent, on average, what feels like two light years creating and editing one spread. People who haven’t worked on a yearbook staff don’t realize the number of style guide and publishing rules and details you need to keep track of to do your job.

For fleeting moments, especially surrounding deadlines, you might question what makes yearbooking worthwhile. Some schools can afford to let yearbook staff buy their books at half price, some let staff members get a free book, some yearbook staff get pizza and snacks. So, there’s that.

Pizza and yearbook discounts are great. But one of the best benefits from being on a yearbook staff is not obvious: Since it’s human nature to undercut ourselves and our abilities, you may not realize all the cool skillz you’re now packing… that you could be monetizing! How?

1. Most of FutureBook’s schools use InDesign to make their yearbooks because InDesign is the professional industry standard for making graphic stuffs and things. If you use our online program, you’ll still learn design principles, photography and journalism—which is great. But, in addition to these, if you know how to use InDesign, you also know how to make business cards, marketing brochures, graphics for websites, posters, invitations and more. In addition to what you have learned in yearbook, all you really need in order to be a designer of print materials is an account with The Noun Project, InkScape (which turns any illustration into a vector graphic, and it’s a free program), and Adobe Ideas on an iPad can be helpful, is super-fun, and easy to use. Want to make watercolour graphics? Just use the amazing Waterlogue app. Anything left that you can’t do, you can subcontract out, finding someone on Craigslist or Fivrr.

A Waterlogue "painting" of a photo taken at Arbutus Middle School, from our brand new Instagram account that you should totally follow at instagram.com/futurebookyearbooks

A Waterlogue “painting” of a photo taken at Arbutus Middle School, from our brand new Instagram account that you should totally follow at instagram.com/futurebookyearbooks

With every design piece that you make, you have one more item to add to your portfolio. Each of these items can eventually be compiled into a website of your own or into a Dribbble account to which you link from your About.me profile.There are always businesses just starting out, or people getting married or throwing an event on a budget. These people would love to hire a student who is just starting to build a design portfolio for themselves. Build that portfolio and you could be freelancing your way through college or university, instead of working in the service industry (if that’s not your cup of tea). Freelancing is uncertain—you’re always having to find gigs and can easily go through dry spells—but you can work from anywhere, on your own time, at your own rates. Freelancing is empowering as you pursue gigs—gigs available all around the world!—and make your own destiny. (Or at least your own coffee fund.)

How do you get gigs?

Post profiles on oDesk, eLance, and Fiverr. Include examples of things you have made. Make calling cards for friends, make marketing materials for businesses for free and then either stop by to give them the samples or mail the materials to them. Say that you are trying to establish a design portfolio and you’re looking for support within your community. You love X and Y about their business/organization and you want to offer some freebie marketing materials to them in the hopes that they will either want to use it now or that they’ll consider you for another job in the future. If they say that they don’t have the money and don’t anticipate having it in the future, ask them if they would at least take a few of your (awesomely designed) amazing business cards, and rave about you to their friends and customers. Who doesn’t want to help out an earnest, hardworking young person trying to become independent and successful? Unconscious people in hospital beds. I can’t think of anyone else.

2. Even if you don’t end up using your yearbook knowledge and the skills you’ve learned to do freelance design work, you are learning how to use programs which intimidate most people. If you ever get an office job, especially at a non-profit organization or a new business, knowing how to use InDesign and PhotoShop will give you an advantage over other job applicants. Every office and business needs someone who knows how to use these programs.

So, if deadlines are stressful right now, and if you’re debating joining yearbook again next year, we hope you’ll stick with it. Not because we would love to work with you again (which we would!) and not because your advisor is really hoping that you’ll bring that knowledge and experience back for the benefit of next year’s book, but as an investment into your own future. Good luck!

reasons to join yearbook

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